A comprehensive resource for safe and responsible laser use

Luxembourg: Laser beam aimed at Air Rescue helicopter

On May 5 2015, a laser beam was aimed at a Luxembourg Air Rescue helicopter flying near the German border. It is not known which country the beam originated from.

At about 10 pm local time, the crew noticed a laser beam aimed at their aircraft. They were able to avoid having the beam go directly into their eye, thanks to quick reaction due to training which LAR holds on a regular basis.

A compaint was filed with Luxembourg Airport police. The incident did not interrupt a mission as the helicopter was returning from a German hospital when the laser beam was spotted.

From the Luxemburger Wort
Click to read more...

US: Drifting diver rescued by aiming laser at searching helicopters

A deep sea diver whose safety line broke and who was drifting out to sea, was rescued November 1 2013 when he aimed a green laser at a helicopter that was searching for him.

When Ron Tubbs failed to surface from his dive off Kaena Point, Oahu, his dive partner contacted the Honolulu Fire Department. A helicopter was sent to search; first from the Fire Department and later a Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter.

As the skies grew dark, Tubbs saw one or both helicopters but they were searching too close to shore. He pulled out a green laser pointer and aimed in the direction of the aircraft. (News stories are not clear as to which helicopter, or perhaps both, Tubbs aimed at.)

Tubbs later said, “When it got dark I think they finally realized they saw the beam of the laser way off in the distance and [I] took care not shine it in their eyes or anything, but in their direction and it reflects off the moisture in the air, so it makes a pretty big beam.”

Ron Tubbs laser submitted
Ron Tubbs, diver rescued by aiming laser at helicopter to get its attention

Ron Tubbs laser rescue 02
Tubbs demonstrates the laser


The laser worked to get the aircrews’ attention. Tubbs was rescued by the Coast Guard helicopter after about four hours in the water, and was taken to a decompression chamber.

Coast Guard Lt. Chris McAndrew said “With how dark it was last night, it would have been impossible to see him unless we were right on top of him, knew exactly where he was. The way were able to find him so quickly was because he had some kind of signaling device.”

From Hawaii News Now, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser, and the Huffington Post

UPDATED February 11 2014: Ron Tubbs wrote to LaserPointerSafety.com, to give advice for anyone who might use a laser to attract rescuers:

“The green laser saved my life. The failure of my other safety gear put me in a very serious position. My physical condition was failing quickly. I was vomiting when they picked me up from over four miles from the search area. Any delay due to the use of my laser to get help was very serious.

“My life was depending on the Coast Guard and Fire Department rescuers. To hurt those who are saving other people's lives with a by shining a laser at them is very serious and could have cost me my life.

“The Coast Guard pilot who saved my life reported to me that the green laser and/or any LED light is not seen with their night vision goggles. Three of the four crew were wearing those goggles.

“I will never scuba dive without my green laser again and have it as a safety device. Even so because night vision goggles do not see LED light I would suggest a nice expensive strobe and very bright flashlight (not LED) too or flares as the main signal device in addition to the laser. Also the Fire Department helicopter would not go near a laser as they have only have one pilot and a glass helicopter floor.

“To shine a laser towards a helicopter could actually cause the rescue to be delayed. Also shining the laser right into their eyes could blind the ones you need to rescue you so be very careful if you do use one to get help. Do not put those trying to rescue you at risk too. Shining in their direction and
not at them will work well enough.

“Thanks to those who saved my life. Please all do not put them at risk further by shining a laser at them! “

Australia: Perth-area man hampers search by aiming laser twice at police helicopter

A search for a missing elderly person in a Perth suburb was disrupted when a police helicopter was twice hit by a laser pointer beam. At about 6:50 pm on September 6 2013, the aircraft was helping in the search when it was hit the first time. It left to do a different task, and came back about 40 minutes later. It was then hit again.

At the same time, several commercial aircraft in the same area reported being hit.

The helicopter directed ground officers to a property in Koondoola. They seized a laser pointer and charged a 36-year-old man with causing fear with laser or light to people in conveyances.

From 7 News and the Herald Sun

US: Arizona teen arrested for lasing rescue helicopter

A 14-year-old was arrested for shining a laser four times on a Maricopa County (Arizona) Sheriff’s Office helicopter that was rescuing lost hikers.
The helicopter was hit on January 6 2012, after returning the hikers to their automobile. The crew identified the source and directed ground officers to a house in Surprise, a town located 20 miles northwest of Phoenix, where four juveniles were found with a laser pointer. Apparently they had also been aiming the laser at cars on a nearby road. After investigation, the 14-year-old was arrested on a felony charge of endangerment.

Maricopa Sheriff Joe Arpaio issued a statement that “this person could have seriously injured my employees and put more lives at risk.”

From AZcentral.com and AZfamily.com

Scotland: Police fail to arrest man who lased RAF helicopter during search operation

Police failed to charge a man who aimed a green laser at an RAF Search and Rescue helicopter in Cowdenbeath, Scotland on November 4 2011. The Sea King was searching for a missing man when the cockpit was illuminated. The pilot reported the location and ground units were sent. Police found the perpetrator, but did not arrest him. The man claimed he had not been aiming at the helicopter but instead was playing with it in his garden.

Local officials were upset. A Fife councillor said “It’s disturbing. Some action should have been taken against the individual and I will be making enquiries…” The local member of Scottish Parliament said she found it “absolutely astounding” that the man was not charged with a serious offense.

From
Deadline News
.

Austria: Teen "hooligans" arrested for lasing rescue helicopter

Teenaged “hooligans” were arrested after a medical rescue helicopter was lased in the Austrian town of Steyr on August 17 2011. The aircraft was illuminated when landing at a hospital to deliver a seriously injured patient; the pilot had green laser light in his eyes. The helicopter was also illuminated again when taking off. The pilots called the police while they circled overhead to identify the beam source.

Two teens were arrested, one 17 and one 19, for endangering air safety. They face up to 10 years in prison.

From The Voice of Russia and Austrian Wings

Ireland: Rescue helicopter distracted by laser

An Irish Coast Guard helicopter was distracted by a green laser beam “throughout” a rescue operation in Bray on July 27 2011. Gardai are asking for anyone with knowledge of the perpetrator to contact them.

From
Bray People. Click the “Rescue” tag in the left hand column to find similar stories of disrupted rescue operations in the UK and elsewhere.

Scotland: Laser causes "considerable distraction" during sea rescue

The crew of a Royal Navy rescue helicopter, helping in a sea rescue August 1 2011, suffered “considerable distraction” from a laser beam. The Sea King helicopter was on standby to help assist local police and coastguard personnel rescuing a woman in the water at Saltcoats, on the Firth of Clyde in North Ayrshire, Scotland.

A Royal Navy spokesperson said the lasing was “extremely reckless and irresponsible behaviour…. Had we been in the middle of a rescue, this person’s actions could have jeopardized our ability to continue.”

Strathclyde Police were notified; as yet no suspect has been identified.

From BBC News. Click the “Rescue” tag in the left hand column to find similar stories of disrupted rescue operations in the UK and elsewhere.

UK: Teens aim laser at helicopter; disrupt river rescue

A Cambridgeshire police helicopter was targeted by a laser beam as it assisted firefighters rescuing a woman from a river. The pilot reported that the light “could have temporarily blinded him.”

Police located and spoke with three teens: a boy (15) and two girls (14 and 16). So far, no charges have been filed in the July 22 2011 incident. An investigation is ongoing.

From
Cambridge News. Click the “Rescue” tag in the left hand column to find similar stories of disrupted rescue operations in the UK and elsewhere.

UPDATE October 3 2011: The Cambridge News reports that the boy has been “reprimanded” and has been “dealt with by the police.” The reprimand was for a first offense. If there is a second offense, a final warning would be issued. On the third offense, the person would be charged and sent to court. From the Cambridge News.

UK: Dover-area sea search called off due to laser pen attack

On June 6 2011, an RAF Sea King helicopter looking for a person in distress in the ocean was forced to call off the search due to being illuminated by a laser pen. Police are trying to find the laser perpetrator.


Site of the search: Copt Point between Folkestone and Dover.
Photo by
Chris Whippet, licensed under CC-by-SA 2.0.

Despite extensive searching by other means, rescuers did not locate the person who was reported to be in distress.

From
Kent Online. Click the “Rescue” tag in the left hand column to find similar stories of disrupted rescue operations in the UK and elsewhere.

Scotland: £4000 (US $6500) fine for flashing laser at rescue helicopter

A 22-year-old was fined £4000 (US $6500, Euro 4500) for flashing a green laser beam at pilots in a rescue helicopter. On Nov. 1 2008, an RAF Sea King helicopter was carrying a teenager injured in a climbing accident. Rosen Romanov dazzled the pilots who were at an altitude of 1000 feet over homes in Caol, Fort William, in Scotland.

The pilots felt that it was only their night-vision goggles, which reduced the glare, that saved them from a “tragic crash”. Romanov was found guilty of culpable and reckless conduct and was fined the record amount.

From the Daily Record. Click the “Rescue” tag in the left hand column to find similar stories of disrupted rescue operations in the UK and elsewhere.

UPDATE: In late August 2009, Romanov’s lawyers appealed, saying “the fine was maybe suitable for the offense, but not enough consideration has been given to his financial circumstances.” A hearing was scheduled for September 10. From the Press and Journal.