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Australia: NSW man arrested for aiming laser at police helicopter

A 23-year-old man was arrested for aiming a laser pointer at the New South Wales police helicopter Polair on November 23 2013.

The helicopter crew had been called to assist with a police operation at a party in Cabramatta, a suburb about 30 miles from Sydney, when about 11pm, the pilot reported a laser beam was being directed at the aircraft. Polair was able to direct Cabramatta police to a unit block in Lansdowne Road, Canley Vale, where they arrested the man and seized a laser pointer.

The man, from Canley Vale, was taken to Cabramatta Police Station where he was charged with use prohibited weapon and act to threaten safety of an aircraft. He was granted conditional bail to appear in Liverpool Local Court on 18 December 2013.

From a New South Wales Police Force press release

Australia: Sydney-area man arrested for pointing laser at police helicopter

A 36-year-old man was arrested in Greenacre, about 15 km from Sydney, one day after a laser pointer was aimed at the New South Wales Police Force’s PolAir2 helicopter on July 20 2013. The helicopter crew contacted Barkstown Police with the location. On July 21, the police executed a search warrant at the address and arrested the unnamed man. He was charged with acting to threaten the safety of an aircraft/person. He was freed on bail and will appear in court on August 21 2013.

From the New South Wales Police Force and News.com.au

Australia: Sydney-area man arrested, jailed for lasing police helicopter

A 39-year-old Leumeah man was arrested after illuminating the Polair 3 police helicopter four times with a green laser on May 8 2012. The pilot said he was disoriented after the laser flashes, which occurred at an altitude of 450 meters (1500 feet) while over Leumeah, a suburb southwest of Sydney. The crew used thermal imaging to locate Matthew William Moore. Ground officers arrested him on his front lawn, and located a nearby laser pointer.

Moore pleaded not guilty to possessing or using a prohibited weapon without a permit, and threatening the safety of an aircraft and the person on board. The was refused bail. A court date of June 1 was set.

From the Herald Sun

Australia: Two NSW laser incidents -- one against aircraft -- being investigated

The following is from a New South Wales Police Force press release dated May 7 2012:

POLICE INVESTIGATE LASER LIGHT ATTACKS - MIRANDA

Police are investigating two separate laser light incidents in Sydney’s south.

About 7:50pm, Sunday 6 May 2012, a Boeing 767 was on approach to Sydney Airport and flying over the Kurnell area when a green laser was pointed at the aircraft. The plane landed safely and police were notified about the incident. Despite police patrols of Kurnell, Bonna Point Reserve and the Botany Bay National Park the culprit of the laser attack was not located.

In another incident, about 12:45am today police were called to a petrol station on the corner of Port Hacking Road and The Kingsway after the store attendant reported a green laser light being shone at the premises. The beam was reported to have come from the vicinity of Kareena Road and despite patrols of the area police could not find any trace of those involved.

Police from Miranda Local Area Command are investigating both incidents and urge anyone with information to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000. Members of the public are reminded that high powered lasers are prohibited weapons and cannot be possessed without a permit.

[End NSW Police Force press release]

Pic 2012-05-07 at 11.42.54 AM
The map shows the Kurnell region (red oval) where the laser was aimed at the aircraft,
and the location of the petrol station (“A” marker), relative to Sydney Airport (center of map).

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Australia: New Year's Eve laser draws no jail term for Taiwan tourist

On December 31 2011, a tourist from Taiwan aimed a laser pointer at a police helicopter hovering over Bradfield Park in Sydney. The beam illuminated the aircraft four times, in bursts of 3-5 seconds each. The pilot was lased directly in the face. Yu-Wei Chang, 27, was arrested by ground units. He pleaded guilty in January.

At his sentencing on February 28 2012, Chang said, “I didn't do that deliberately, it was totally reckless behavior and I didn't realize the serious consequences at all.” He had previously used a laser pointer in his work in Taiwan as a tour guide. The judge agreed the act was not malicious but said it was “extremely dangerous” and Chang had to receive a prison sentence. The judge referred to four similar Australian court cases. She said three offenders were given jail terms and two received suspended sentences.

On a charge of threatening safety of an aircraft, Chang was sentenced to three months in prison, suspended on condition of paying AUD $200 and entering into a 12-month good behavior bond. On a charge of pointing a laser in public, Chang received four months prison; this was also suspended. He was also ordered to pay court costs; the amount was not specified in news articles.

Chang said he expects to leave Australia in April. He said he was grateful for the suspended sentence, thanking the judge and the Australian government.

From The Australian and the Daily Telegraph. The original LaserPointerSafety.com story is here.

Australia: UPDATED - Laser pen aimed at police during New Year's Eve festivities

A “high-powered” laser pointer was aimed at a Sydney police helicopter during a New Years Eve 2011 celebration in Bradfield Park. The helicopter was targeted four times; no injuries were reported. Ground officers were directed to a person in the crowd who was arrested.

The 27-year-old native of Taiwan was charged with threatening the safety of aircraft and the possession of a laser pointer in a public space. He was interviewed through an interpreter and had to surrender his passport. A court date of January 24 was set.

From Mosman Daily and DailyTelegraph.com

UPDATE, January 23 2012 -- Yu-Wei Chang pleaded guilty to threatening the safety of an aircraft, and to possessing a laser pointer in a public place. Chang had previously used the pointer in his job in Taiwan, as a tour guide. His solicitor said Chang did not intend any harm. He did not know it was illegal to possess lasers in New South Wales or to aim at an aircraft. Chang did it due to “New Year’s Eve exuberance.” Chang will be sentenced on February 28. The judge said she needed to get more information about similar cases in Australia, and to consider options other than imprisonment. She did say “there will be some punishment.”

Yu-Wei Chang laser
Chang after the guilty plea


UPDATE 2, February 28 2012 - Chang was sentenced to three months in prison on one charge, and four months on another charge. Both prison terms were suspended on condition of paying AUS $200 and entering into a 12-month good behavior bond. Details are here.

From Mosman Daily, 9News and DailyTelegraph.com

Australia: Arrest for repeatedly aiming laser at police helicopter

On September 29 2011, a green laser pen was pointed five times in seven minutes at a police helicopter patrolling near North Rocks, a suburb about 26 km northwest of Sydney. The air crew identified the location and ground units arrested a 20-year-old in Glenwood, about 9 km from North Rocks.

The man was charged with possession or use of a prohibited weapon without permit, and an act threatening the safety of an aircraft with a person on board. He was granted bail.

From 9News, ABC Sydney and NSW Police Force

Australia: Laser aimed at aircraft near Sydney

A commercial aircraft was illuminated by a green laser aimed from the Cronulla area of Sydney, just after takeoff on an August 13 2011 flight to Canberra. Miranda Police searched for the perpetrator without success. The New South Wales police put out a press release asking for the public’s help in finding who lased the airplane.

From 9 News and the NSW Police

Australia: Laser targets plane at Sydney airport

A green laser beam was aimed at a passenger aircraft as it took off from Sydney Airport the evening of July 8 2011. New South Wales police are asking for public assistance in finding the perpetrator. The laser is thought to have come from the Hurstville area in south Sydney.

From a
NSW Police press release and Sky News Australia

Australia: Airplane targeted on takeoff; man arrested

A 27-year old Sydney-area man was arrested April 19 2011. He was charged with using a prohibited weapon and committing an act to threaten the safety of an aircraft. (In NSW, laser pointers above a certain power are classed as “prohibited weapons” and may not be possessed or used without a permit.)

The arrest occurred one day after a commercial aircraft taking off from Sydney Airport reported being illuminated by laser light. Police had reports of green laser use in Bardwell Park, west of the airport, and tracked the use to the 27-year-old. His laser pointer was seized and tested, and found to be in the “prohibited weapon” category.

From the Herald Sun and a NSW Police Force press release

UPDATE, MAY 10 2011: Two men were arrested, 27-year-old Sergio Mitso Nagaoka and 21-year-old Lucas Fagundes Olhiara. They are Portuguese-speaking Brazilian citizens. Nagaoka was charged with using a prohibited weapon, and threatening the safety of an aircraft. Olhiara was charged with possessing a prohibited weapon without a permit. (Note: Some news reports transposed the 21-year-old’s name, writing it as “Lucas Olhiara Fagundes”. LaserPointerSafety.com does not know which version is correct.)

Update from the
St. George and Sutherland Shire Leader

Australia: Laser illumination at Sydney Airport

An aircraft landing at Sydney Airport was lased about 9 pm March 13 2011. The green beam appeared to come from the Redfern or Surry Hills area.

New South Wales prohibits the possession of laser pointers without a permit, and classifies them as dangerous weapons.

From the
Sydney Morning Herald

Australia: Three aircraft targeted in Sydney

Three commercial flights were illuminated by lasers within a 90-minute period as they were landing at Sydney Airport on April 13 2011.

The first incident happened about 9 pm, the second was at 10:25 and the third came at 10:28. The pilot of the third airplane was illuminated directly in the eye; there was no reported injury.

News accounts noted that “high powered laser pointers are prohibited weapons and can’t be possessed without a permit.”

From
Sky News and the Sydney Morning Herald

Australia: UPDATED - 2008 "cluster attack" caused by boys on bicycles

In an incident in late March 2008, six planes had to alter their flight paths into Sydney’s airport after pilots reported a “coordinated cluster attack” of “up to four” laser beams. This incident has been cited numerous times as perhaps being a dry run or test for some more sinister laser usage.

However, it turns out that this incident was caused by boys on bicycles, apparently acting without pre-planning and not knowing how the lasers would affect pilot vision. During a Feb. 2011 briefing to the SAE G10T laser safety group , FAA flight standards liaison Patrick Hempen said that the truth about Sydney has not caught up with the news stories: “The attacks are usually spontaneous in nature, perpetrated by careless or malicious persons.”

Hempen said that investigation by US and Australian officials revealed that the Sydney "cluster attack" was caused by youths, riding their bicycles on a golf course at night, who stopped and took the occasion to illuminate landing aircraft. He noted that the youths’ local community had a history of acrimony directed at the airport authority due to the construction of a new runway which caused more flights over their residential area.

Hempen also investigated several laser events in the Mideast and found many of the so-called "deliberate attacks" to be similar; they were “events perpetrated by youths, in a party-like atmosphere, without care or knowledge of the havoc that they were causing.”

Based on a Feb. 1, 2011 presentation to SAE G10T.

Australia: Six planes targeted in alleged "coordinated cluster attack"

Six planes had to alter their flight paths into Sydney airport after pilots were targeted in an unprecedented laser "cluster attack”, authorities say. [This was later found NOT to be a coordinated attack; see 2011 Update below.]

Air traffic controllers had to close one flight approach late on Friday, after up to four people targeted planes with lasers in an apparently co-ordinated attack. Pilots reported a number of green lasers were trained on their planes for about 15 minutes, from 10.30pm (AEDT). The lasers appeared to have originated from the Bexley area, in south-western Sydney.

"This was the worst attack in our experience," Air Services Australia spokesman Bryan Nicholson has told Fairfax News. "It was described by the pilots as a cluster attack which implies some sort of co-ordination or organisation."

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) said such laser attacks on planes were increasing in frequency. "There are five to six reports every week around Australia," CASA spokesman Peter Gibson told Fairfax. "It is extremely dangerous as it can temporarily blind a pilot or distract them as they are coming in to land."

NSW Police Minister David Campbell vowed to change the law to classify powerful laser beams as illegal weapons. "These gutless and cowardly attacks have to be stopped," he said. "I am preparing a proposal to cabinet to consider making these items a prohibited weapon."

The maximum penalty for shining a laser at a plane is two years in jail.

From the Herald Sun and the Sydney Morning Herald

*2011 UPDATE: Investigation by US and Australian officials revealed that the "cluster attack" was caused by youths, riding their bicycles on a golf course at night, who stopped and took the occasion to illuminate landing aircraft. It might be noted that their local community had a history of acrimony directed at the airport authority due to the construction of a new runway which caused more flights over their residential area. In a Feb. 2011 presentation to the SAE G10T group, attended by LaserPointerSafety.com, FAA flight standards liaison Patrick Hempen said the truth about Sydney has not caught up with the news stories. “The attacks are usually spontaneous in nature, perpetrated by careless or malicious persons.” Hempen also investigated several laser events in the Mideast and found many of the so-called "deliberate attacks" to be similar; they were “events perpetrated by youths, in a party-like atmosphere, without care or knowledge of the havoc that they were causing.”

Australia: "Laser fool" sentenced, fined for illuminating police helicopter

A Sydney mechanic who deliberately shone a laser into the eyes of police as they hovered in a helicopter hundreds of metres above homes in Sydney's northwest was yesterday sentenced to six months jail.

Zakary Patrick Babet, of Bella Vista, was yesterday convinced in Hornsby Local Court of interfering with a crew member while in an aircraft.

Magistrate Leslie Brennan called Babet a "fool", and labelled his actions as a "serious" offence.
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