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UK: 12 month community order for Farnworth man who aimed laser pen at police helicopter

James Hunt, 27, of Farnworth was sentenced September 10 2014, for aiming a laser pen from his bedroom window at a police helicopter on May 23 2014. The laser strike caused the helicopter to abandon a search for a missing person, in order to determine Hunt’s location in Farnworth, a town of 25,000 that is situated nine miles northwest of Manchester.

In August, Hunt pleaded guilty to acting in a manner likely to endanger an aircraft, and to possession of cannabis. He was given a community order for 12 months, a supervision order, was fined £20, was ordered to pay a £60 victim surcharge, and he had his laser pen and cannabis forfeited.

From the Bolton News

UK: Police helicopter struck by laser near Manchester; 13-year-old involved

A Greater Manchester police helicopter was dazzled by the beam from a laser pen on August 16 2014, as it flew over Eccles, about 4 miles west of Manchester.

The pilot located the beam at the Brookstone Estate in Peel Green. Ground officers found a 13-year-old with a laser. They confiscated the laser and spoke to the youth. No charges were immediately filed, but an investigation is ongoing.

The pilot did not need or seek medical attention.

According to the chief inspector, there were five incidents “in the past couple of months.”

From the Manchester Evening News

UK: Two Manchester-area teens arrested for aiming laser at police helicopter

Two teenagers, 14 and 17, were arrested for endangering the safety of an aircraft on December 21 2013, by aiming a laser pen at a police helicopter. The teens were from Wigan, a town in greater Manchester. They were released on bail until February 19 2014.

From Wigan Today

UK: 4 months jail for "endangering aircraft"

A 21-year-old man from Greater Manchester who temporarily blinded a police helicopter pilot with a laser pen has been jailed for four months. Dean Bottomley, of Stockport, pleaded guilty to endangering an aircraft during an earlier hearing at Manchester Minshull Street Crown Court.

Pilot Captain Mark Westwood told the court: "The overall effect was temporary blindness. I lost outside visual reference and could not see the instrumentation displayed in the aircraft.”

After the first incident he had to fly blind, taking emergency evasive action to position the helicopter out of the beam. He added: "It was a very dangerous manoeuvre, but I had to do it to get myself out of that dazzle."
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