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Scotland: Woman attacked by teens with laser pen, blinded in one eye

A 33-year-old woman was blinded in one eye by a laser pen during an attack by two boys who were about 14 or 15 years old.

She was walking on a road, under a railway bridge, in Clydebank when the incident took place at about 10 pm on September 10 2016. The exact nature of the attack — whether money was demanded or if the lasing was random — was not described in news accounts.

The woman was taken to a hospital about 4 miles away. She later reported the assault to the police. News about the attack was not released until a week later.

News reports quoted a Police Scotland spokesperson as saying, “This was a completely unprovoked and senseless attack on this woman, which has left her blind in one eye. The youths responsible must be caught as soon as possible. To point a laser pen at someone is highly irresponsible. Extensive inquiries are ongoing to trace the two boys, with officers carrying out inquiries in the local area and studying CCTV footage to identify them.”

The attack comes just a few days after a man was arrested for aiming a laser pen at a Police Scotland helicopter in Clydebank on September 5 2016.

From BBC News and Glasgow Evening Times

Scotland: UEFA opens investigation about laser pointer aimed at Aberdeen player

UEFA (Union of European Football Associations) has opened an investigation into a July 2 2015 match between the Aberdeen Dons and KF Shkendija in Macedonia. Dons goalkeeper Danny Ward had a laser aimed into his face by Shkendija fans.

UEFA could impose a fine of €10,000 on the Macedonian club.

Aberdeen Dons Danny Ward laser
Laser light in goalkeeper Danny Don’s face


From the
Herald and the Evening Express

Scotland: Lasers aimed at climbers, rescuers on UK's highest mountain

The leader of the Lochaber Mountain Rescue Team was on an after-dark rescue early in September 2014, when “quite a powerful laser” was aimed at them.

The team was on Ben Nevis, the highest peak in the U.K. They were wearing head torches, so their light would be easy to see from lower altitudes.

Team leader John Stevenson estimated that the beam came from Glen Nevis, a couple of miles away. He told the Press and Journal that the green beam “could easily have caused someone to lose their balance causing them to fall and possibly injure themselves. Luckily it did not affect our rescue, but it goes without saying that it is an extremely dangerous thing to do.”

Stevenson said such lasings had happened before to his team, and also to another climber walking in the Ben Nevis area in mid-September.

From the Press and Journal

Scotland: Car driver distracted by green laser

The driver of an automobile reported being distracted by a green laser in Stonehaven, Aberdeenshire, Scotland according to police. They appealed for anyone with information to contact them.

More details at the BBC News website.