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US: FDA issues warning about laser toys

On November 24 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a “Consumer Update” warning of the dangers of laser toys.

FDA gave these examples of laser toys:
  • Lasers mounted on toy guns that can be used for “aiming”;
  • Spinning tops that project laser beams while they spin;
  • Hand-held lasers used during play as “light sabers”; and
  • Lasers intended for entertainment that create optical effects in an open room.

According to the Consumer Update, “Toys with lasers are of particular interest to the FDA because children can be injured by these products. Because they are marketed as toys, parents and kids alike may believe they’re safe to use.”

The FDA had tips for safe use, including:
  • Do not aim at persons or animals
  • Do not aim at any vehicle, aircraft or shiny surface; or persons playing sports
  • Children’s toy lasers should be Class I.
  • Children should not be allowed to own or use laser pointers. Pointers are not toys.
  • Do not buy or use any laser that emits more than 5 milliwatts.
  • See a health care professional in case of a known or suspected laser eye injury.

The FDA’s health warning was referenced in numerous news and publication sources over the 2017 holiday season.

From the FDA Consumer Update, “Laser Toys: How to Keep Kids Safe”. FDA also linked to a 2015 FDA YouTube video on laser pointer safety.

For background, LaserPointerSafety.com has a series of webpages about laser toys which begin with a summary